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NEW YORK

Round Trip

New York - Dubrovnik - New York

Premium Economy Class

From:

$1,849

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KUALA LUMPUR

Round Trip

Kuala Lumpur - Prague - Kuala Lumpur

Premium Economy Class

From:

$1,899

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LOS ANGELES

Round Trip

Los Angeles - Dubrovnik - Los Angeles

Premium Economy Class

From:

$2,399

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TOKYO

Round Trip

Tokyo - Prague - Tokyo

Premium Economy Class

From:

$2,099

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SINGAPORE

Round Trip

Singapore - Prague - Singapore

Premium Economy Class

From:

$1,999

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BEIJING

Round Trip

Beijing - Dubrovnik - Beijing

Premium Economy Class

From:

$1,949

Tailored travel products and airline for the globetrotters!

 
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All-inclusive Travel Packages

7-day and 14-day Round Trips

Scheduled Direct Flights

Airbus A350 Fleet

Premium Onboard Service

Direct flights from/to Prague, Czechia

 
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Prague is the capital and largest city in the Czech Republic, the 13th largest city in the European Union, and the historical capital of Bohemia. Situated on the Vltava river, Prague is home to about 1.3 million people, while its metropolitan area is estimated to have a population of 2.7 million. The city has a temperate oceanic climate, with relatively warm summers and chilly winters.

Prague is a political, cultural, and economic center of central Europe complete with a rich history. Founded during the Romanesque and flourishing by the Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque eras, Prague was the capital of the Kingdom of Bohemia and the main residence of several Holy Roman Emperors, most notably of Charles IV (r. 1346–1378). It was an important city to the Habsburg Monarchy and its Austro-Hungarian Empire. The city played major roles in the Bohemian and the Protestant Reformations, the Thirty Years' War, and in 20th-century history as the capital of Czechoslovakia between the World Wars and the post-war Communist era.

Prague is home to a number of well-known cultural attractions, many of which survived the violence and destruction of 20th-century Europe. Main attractions include Prague Castle, Charles Bridge, Old Town Square with the Prague astronomical clock, the Jewish Quarter, Petřín hill, and Vyšehrad. Since 1992, the extensive historic center of Prague has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

The city has more than ten major museums, along with numerous theaters, galleries, cinemas, and other historical exhibits. An extensive modern public transportation system connects the city. It is home to a wide range of public and private schools, including Charles University in Prague, the oldest university in Central Europe.

Prague is classified as an "Alpha-" global city according to GaWC studies. In 2019, the city was ranked as the 69th most livable city in the world by Mercer. In the same year, the PICSA Index ranked the city as the 13th most livable city in the world. Its rich history makes it a popular tourist destination and as of 2017, the city receives more than 8.5 million international visitors annually. In 2017 Prague was listed as the fifth most visited European city after London, Paris, Rome, and Istanbul.

Direct flights from/to Dubrovnik, Croatia

 
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Dubrovnik, historically known as Ragusa, is a city on the Adriatic Sea in southern Croatia. It is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean Sea, a seaport, and the center of Dubrovnik-Neretva County. Situated in an exclave, it is connected to the rest of the country by the Pelješac Bridge. Its total population is 42,615. In 1979, the city of Dubrovnik was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in recognition of its outstanding medieval architecture and fortified old town.

The history of the city probably dates back to the 7th century, when the town known as Ragusa was founded by refugees from Epidaurus (Ragusa Vecchia). It was under the protection of the Byzantine Empire and later under the sovereignty of the Republic of Venice. Between the 14th and 19th centuries, Dubrovnik ruled itself as a free state. The prosperity of the city was historically based on maritime trade; as the capital of the maritime Republic of Ragusa, it achieved a high level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries, as it became notable for its wealth and skilled diplomacy. At the same time, Dubrovnik became a cradle of Croatian literature.

The entire city was almost destroyed when a devastating earthquake hit in 1667. During the Napoleonic Wars, Dubrovnik was occupied by the French Empire forces, and then the Republic of Ragusa was abolished and incorporated into the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy and later into the Illyrian Provinces. Later on, in the early 19th to early 20th century, Dubrovnik was part of the Kingdom of Dalmatia within the Austrian Empire. Dubrovnik became part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia immediately upon its creation, and it was incorporated into its Zeta Banovina in 1929, before becoming part of the Banovina of Croatia upon its creation in 1939. During World War II, it was part of the Axis puppet state Independent State of Croatia, before being reincorporated into SR Croatia in SFR Yugoslavia.

In 1991, during the Croatian War of Independence, Dubrovnik was besieged by the Yugoslav People's Army for seven months and suffered significant damage from shelling. After undergoing repair and restoration works in the 1990s and early 2000s, it re-emerged as one of the Mediterranean's top tourist destinations, as well as a popular filming location.

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